Blend4web vs. Three.js

As a sequel to my Feb 23 post X3DOM vs. Three.js, I’d like to quickly compare Blend4web vs. Three.js, using that same old arbitrary VRML file as a neutral sample. Blend4web is an add-on for Blender, the open-source 3D authoring tool I use.

Here’s how the Blender workspace containing my old VRML file looks when I export it using Blend4web:

And here’s the same Blender workspace exported as a COLLADA file and then imported into Three.js:

You can drag your mouse on either of those to move them around. Each button gives you a different motion when you drag. Each example uses each button in a different way.

Continue reading “Blend4web vs. Three.js”

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Open Standards, Goggle Snobbery, and the Browser Wars

I remember the moment the so-called Browser Wars redefined everything we were doing on the web. It was the Twentieth Century. The web, and browsers, were the most amazing things ever. We didn’t give a darn about “open standards”, and we were creating these awesome Java Applets that could connect to a server, and provide multi-user interaction on the web. Then one day, one of my co-workers came into my office, looking like he’d just been hit by a bus.

“Microsoft has just released its new Java.” he told me.

“Cool.” I said, chewing my bubblegum and turning my attention back to the emacs window on my computer.

“No, it’s not cool.” he retorted. “It’s their OWN version of Java. Real Java won’t work in IE any more.” Continue reading “Open Standards, Goggle Snobbery, and the Browser Wars”

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X3DOM vs. Three.js

Here’s a quick look at X3DOM vs. three.js. Two very different tools, that both do something I’m very interested in – allow you to publish 3D content and virtual worlds on the open web, without a plugin.

I found two good ways to get 3D content (from an ancient VRML file) out of Blender, and out on the open web where anyone with a browser can see them without a plugin. So I’d like to compare X3DOM vs. Three.js.

I loaded a COLLADA file into Three.js:

And I loaded an X3D file with X3DOM:

You can drag your mouse on either of those to move them around. Each button gives you a different motion when you drag. Each example uses each button in a different way. Continue reading “X3DOM vs. Three.js”

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Tool Agnostic – definition and practical limitations

They do say that everything is best in moderation, including moderation itself – perhaps the same applies to being a tool agnostic.

“Tool Agnostic” is a cool, but relatively obscure, term that describes an approach to technology free from prejudice. I just Googled “tool agnostic” definition, and didn’t really wind up with anything. So, that to me smacks of an opportunity to post one and get this party rolling.

Let’s start with the term “agnostic” itself. From Mirriam-Webster, the #2 definition stands without restricting itself to the subject of religion or God:

Full Definition of agnostic […] 2 :  a person who is Continue reading “Tool Agnostic – definition and practical limitations”

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HTML5, the 3D Web, and the Death of Plugins

Hopefully, the world will soon be as hungry to show 3D stuff without a plugin, as the world has been to show rotating banners and videos without Flash. And for all the same reasons. Here’s some thoughts on the agonizingly slow death of plugins.

I spent many years working in Adobe Flash. From fun little flourishes to otherwise flat websites, to full-on interactive educational applications that provided feedback as to what was working educationally and what was not – I really liked Flash. I liked it, even as the Death of Plugins lurked menacingly around the next corner.

Then came the decree – “Flash is Dead”. While it took some people more years than other to accept this – by this point in time it is clear – if you want your stuff to be on the “open web” – you cannot use Flash. If you’re still disinclined to disagree with me on that, here’s Continue reading “HTML5, the 3D Web, and the Death of Plugins”

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