Blender to three.js with COLLADA files

Given this phrase in the Wikipedia definition of COLLADA files – “… for exchanging digital assets among various graphics software applications …” – it should come as no surprise that I found the COLLADA format the most effective for exchanging digital assets between Blender and three.js

One running gag on this blog is my repeated attempts at getting the content in my old VRML files on the open web and rendering in a browser again – and this time, without the use of plugins.

I’ve tried importing old VRML directly into three.js – with somewhat less than satisfactory results. I’ve discovered that those old file load nicely into Blender – and I’ve tried any number of way of exporting them from Blender again, with the hopes of loading those formats into three.js.

collada-bannerFor me, the winner by far, was COLLADA files. Continue reading “Blender to three.js with COLLADA files”

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360 degree images with three.js

A full wrap-around photographic background goes a long way, turning a few goofy primitives floating in space into an immersive virtual world.

This is just my Dancing Donut exercise of a few weeks back, with the addition of a photograph. Though, how the photograph is structured – and how it is added – is quite different from what you might experience adding a photograph to a flat web page. Continue reading “360 degree images with three.js”

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HTML5, the 3D Web, and the Death of Plugins

Hopefully, the world will soon be as hungry to show 3D stuff without a plugin, as the world has been to show rotating banners and videos without Flash. And for all the same reasons. Here’s some thoughts on the agonizingly slow death of plugins.

I spent many years working in Adobe Flash. From fun little flourishes to otherwise flat websites, to full-on interactive educational applications that provided feedback as to what was working educationally and what was not – I really liked Flash. I liked it, even as the Death of Plugins lurked menacingly around the next corner.

Then came the decree – “Flash is Dead”. While it took some people more years than other to accept this – by this point in time it is clear – if you want your stuff to be on the “open web” – you cannot use Flash. If you’re still disinclined to disagree with me on that, here’s Continue reading “HTML5, the 3D Web, and the Death of Plugins”

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Before I download Blender

Content and code. At least from my experience, working on the web means wrangling content and code to achieve a worthwhile user experience. When working with the flat web, the basic types of content are text, graphics, and audio/video. In a 3D environment, there are also models and worlds. The obvious choice of an application to use for creating or editing content for the 3D web in this day and age is something called “Blender”.

Many years ago, I tried out a program called 3DSmax. (It has gone by the official names 3D Studio Max, 3dsmax, and 3ds Max, so I’ll admit my “spelling” of the product name is not official.) Continue reading “Before I download Blender”

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Minecraft Realms and how to set them up.

In a lot of ways, setting up a Minecraft Realm is easier than setting up a website. When you sign up for a website, you have to find a company, get in touch with the company, make payment, get login information, access your server, stuff like that. With Minecraft, it’s a complete and utter no-brainer. The Minecraft program overtly drags you through the entire process.

Minecraft Realms are so easy it’d make your head spin, and so useful and fun that if you’re even remotely considering it – it’s worth the bother.

As this site is about the 3D web, and as Minecraft isn’t a web thing, I often draw parallels between the two. In this post, I’m gonna begin by rattling off any number of similarities between Minecraft and the Web. Continue reading “Minecraft Realms and how to set them up.”

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Siloed Content

Those big round vertical things that they store grain in. That’s a silo. Well, lo and behold, it turns out that “silo” is also a verb. It means “to separate”. If something has been “siloed”, it has been separated from the rest of the world. Which makes good sense, given what a silo does with the grain. It separates it from the rest of the world.

In yesterday’s post, I discussed the Open Web, and posted a link to a blog article by a fellow who discusses siloed content and the open web in a very thoughtful manner. Continue reading “Siloed Content”

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Artist, Content, Audience, the Internet – and David Bowie

When I set up this site recently, I didn’t imagine that I’d be posting anything like a David Bowie video here.

David Bowie passed away yesterday. And my Facebook has been chock-a-block with tributes, memes, a hundred music videos, and this interview.

In this video, Mr. Bowie speaks with great insight and eloquence on the subject of the Internet. And how the internet “will” radically alter Continue reading “Artist, Content, Audience, the Internet – and David Bowie”

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