360 Photos with Prisma Effects

I’ve seen the photos re-touched by the Prisma app for weeks. Just the other day, the app became available for Android. I’d been impressed by the things I’d seen. I downloaded it right away.

As I’d been having a good time with 360 photos recently, I decided I wanted to try to add Prisma effects to one of those. Could I make a 360 photo look like a 360 painting?

360 Photo with effects from the Prisma app. Looks like a 360 painting.

[Click image to enter photosphere.]

Continue reading “360 Photos with Prisma Effects”

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on LinkedInShare on FacebookEmail this to someone

Snow and the WebVR Boilerplate

Back in the days of Flash, I’d get to “model” snow a couple of times around Christmas every year. For some animated corporate Christmas cards, usually. So, when the time came to try out the WebVR Boilerplate – that’s what I chose for my first experiment. Gently falling snow.

(The above example is an iFrame – to pop it out for your VR goggles, click here)

The WebVR Boilerplate is a collection of files that does everything you need to do to get something in WebVR up and running, really easy. So that seems perfect for me! The base-state of the boilerplate shows just a rotating cube, in a room defined by a bright green grid. So all I did, to make this demo, was to remove the cube and start coding up the snow!

Continue reading “Snow and the WebVR Boilerplate”

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on LinkedInShare on FacebookEmail this to someone

Storysharing – Beyond Storytelling in VR

Storysharing in VR - photo by Pete GrayA lot has been made of the role of VR in the art of storytelling. Even more has been made of the role of storytelling in the fledgling art of VR. At first, I was fascinated by the idea. But the more I thought about it – the more I read about it – the more I started to wonder how many “interactive” concepts could be added to an idea that is 7/12 “telling”, without the very idea of “storytelling” bursting at the seams. The dead-end implications of “telling” anything to users with the capacity for full interaction weighed on me. So I came up with the term storysharing.

Continue reading “Storysharing – Beyond Storytelling in VR”

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on LinkedInShare on FacebookEmail this to someone

Super Stylized Solar System with A-Frame VR

For my first attempt at creating VR content for the web, I tried something called A-Frame. And it was as easy as the day is long.

(This is in an iFrame – to pop it out for your VR goggles, click here)

Obviously, this demo is just a doodle. A boisterous doodle.

Continue reading “Super Stylized Solar System with A-Frame VR”

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on LinkedInShare on FacebookEmail this to someone

WebVR is Easy with A-Frame

About a week ago, I got my first set of VR goggles. Nothing fancy – it’s the Samsung Gear VR. I explored some of the demos. (great fun!) Some of what I explored was WebVR, which just became available on Gear VR (without the use of “experimental browsers”) a couple of weeks ago – albeit with a “deprecated API”. (which means, an old obsolete version.) Then I took a crack at a tool called A-Frame.

WebVR is easy with A-FrameA-Frame makes WebVR easy. Easy peasy. It reminds me of X3DOM – it’s a “declarative language”, so it drives a lot like HTML5. All of the things you declare when you’re using A-Frame get added to the “DOM” (Document Object Model), so everything in your “world” can be accessed and manipulated just like you would the elements on a plain, old-fashioned web page. Which, really, makes a lot of things easy. Easy peasy.

Continue reading “WebVR is Easy with A-Frame”

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on LinkedInShare on FacebookEmail this to someone

VR for Web Developers

So you’re a web developer, and you’ve been hearing things about VR. I’m also a web developer, and I’ve also been hearing things about VR! And I’ve been blogging about it. Not just VR – but how VR is very likely to soon become both a crisis and an opportunity for web developers. So what are the prospects for VR for web developers?

The dawn of virtual reality.Today is April 8, 2016. The Oculus Rift and the HTC Vive both tried to start shipping in the last couple of weeks – and it’s been a bit of a mess. But even so, eager early adopters have raved up and down that this revolutionary technology finally actually works.

Continue reading “VR for Web Developers”

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on LinkedInShare on FacebookEmail this to someone

A Logo Made in Minecraft

I need a logo for this site, and any big enterprise that may arise from it.

I think it behooves me to have a really 3-dimensional logo. It seems trendy these days to have a logo that is some sort of stylized cube with its vertices painted flat, as though for printing. I think I want something really, really 3D.

a rough draft of a logo for 3dspace, designed and rendered in Minecraft

So I had this idea pop into my head – it’s a bit like the trendy cubish ones, but it is, indeed, really really 3D: Continue reading “A Logo Made in Minecraft”

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on LinkedInShare on FacebookEmail this to someone

Code & Art

I didn’t learn anything about three.js doing this – it’s all the same technojunk as my previous “experiments”. But this is fun. This is code & art.

As I was going through the introductory websites for three.js, I couldn’t help but notice that one thing that’s very common in a “beginner’s demo” was virtual worlds stuffed with a whole bunch of similar geometric primitives. Cool. But none of the demos I saw went beyond demo. They tend to be pretty colourless, pretty motionless, pretty boring.

So I couldn’t help but get something stuck in my head. Oh sure, it’s an ocean of geometric primitives. And sure, I didn’t learn anything about three.js doing this – it’s all the same technojunk as my previous “experiments”. But this is fun. Continue reading “Code & Art”

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on LinkedInShare on FacebookEmail this to someone