How to work with old VRML files

So how then to bring those old VRML files back into the fold? I have many old VRML “worlds” that I wrote for Cosmo Player back in the ’90s. It would be great if I could open those old files in one of the new technologies.

VRML stands for “Virtual Reality Modeling Language”. According to Wikipedia, VRML “is a standard file format for representing 3-dimensional (3D) interactive vector graphics, designed particularly with the World Wide Web in mind. It has been superseded by X3D.”

Not only has it been superseded by X3D, it’s pretty much obsolete on the web. Boutiquey web players exist – and the format is used for Continue reading “How to work with old VRML files”

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Loading VRML into three.js, Revisited

In an earlier post, I did an experiment where I tried to load some of my antique VRML files into three.js, so that they could be experienced in a browser without the long-defunct Cosmo Player. The experiment concluded that loading directly is not going to be an effective way to resurrect those virtual worlds.

What I’m trying now is a good deal more Goldbergian, but from what I’ve seen so far, it just might work. First, we import Continue reading “Loading VRML into three.js, Revisited”

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Code & Art

I didn’t learn anything about three.js doing this – it’s all the same technojunk as my previous “experiments”. But this is fun. This is code & art.

As I was going through the introductory websites for three.js, I couldn’t help but notice that one thing that’s very common in a “beginner’s demo” was virtual worlds stuffed with a whole bunch of similar geometric primitives. Cool. But none of the demos I saw went beyond demo. They tend to be pretty colourless, pretty motionless, pretty boring.

So I couldn’t help but get something stuck in my head. Oh sure, it’s an ocean of geometric primitives. And sure, I didn’t learn anything about three.js doing this – it’s all the same technojunk as my previous “experiments”. But this is fun. Continue reading “Code & Art”

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Siloed Content

Those big round vertical things that they store grain in. That’s a silo. Well, lo and behold, it turns out that “silo” is also a verb. It means “to separate”. If something has been “siloed”, it has been separated from the rest of the world. Which makes good sense, given what a silo does with the grain. It separates it from the rest of the world.

In yesterday’s post, I discussed the Open Web, and posted a link to a blog article by a fellow who discusses siloed content and the open web in a very thoughtful manner. Continue reading “Siloed Content”

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The Open Web

Though, through the use of cool javascript stuff, from AJAX to three.js, and a ubiquitous rendering technology known as OpenGL, a great deal is possible. All without the use of plugins.

Ever since I first heard about “the internet”, I was fascinated. A giant worldwide computer network for everybody? Wow. The implications were staggering, even at first blush. And still, 20 years later, what it has become goes way beyond what could ever have been imagined.

One of the key words in the paragraph above is “everybody”. And that is the subject of this post Continue reading “The Open Web”

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Plasticine, Lego, Minecraft, and the 3D Web

Most people have modeled stuff with clay, play-doh, Femo, or plasticine. Lots of people have used Lego to make 3D things. But very few of us have created 3D content using digital tools, much less deployed it on the web for others to enjoy.

Everyone alive today is intimately familiar with creating 2D content. We’ve all written on a piece of paper – and most of us have used a word processor to make our content easier to produce and publish. We’ve all drawn a picture on a piece of paper – and most of us have taken photographs to capture much more visual information in the blink of an eye. Continue reading “Plasticine, Lego, Minecraft, and the 3D Web”

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3D Content

For the most part, at this point in time (the beginning of 2016) creating 3D content, publishing it to the web, and making it possible for users from anywhere in the world to find and interact with that content, is a bit of a novelty act.

Whether we’re talking about web1.0, web2.0, or web3.0, there are two key ingredients to the web: content and users.

Before web2.0, users used things like search engines to find content. When web2.0 came of age, other users guided us to content that we may or may not have ever found using web1.0 tools. At the beginning of 2016, we stand on the cusp of web3.0 – a time when the “user agents” of the web will become intelligent enough to guide users to content in a superior manner to that which can be achieved using search engines or social networking. Continue reading “3D Content”

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3dspace – First Post

My name is Pete. I’ve been busy with 2-dimensional technologies like Java, Flash, and Wordpress – as well as the methodologies and commercial applications of analytics and user experience design – since I mothballed my enthusiasm for a “3D web” back around the turn of the Century.

Greetings, and welcome to 3dspace.

3dspace.com was originally intended to be a website about VRML – Virtual Reality Modeling Language – back in the 1990’s.

VRML failed to materialize as a commercially viable technology – and the domain name lay dormant for almost Continue reading “3dspace – First Post”

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