Artist, Content, Audience, the Internet – and David Bowie

When I set up this site recently, I didn’t imagine that I’d be posting anything like a David Bowie video here.

David Bowie passed away yesterday. And my Facebook has been chock-a-block with tributes, memes, a hundred music videos, and this interview.

In this video, Mr. Bowie speaks with great insight and eloquence on the subject of the Internet. And how the internet “will” radically alter Continue reading “Artist, Content, Audience, the Internet – and David Bowie”

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Refused to create native OpenGL context because of blacklisting???

So, as one who just wants to get back to making stuff, having just learned that my browser, perhaps quite rightly, doesn’t entirely trust my graphics card not to spring a memory leak, what was I to do?

One day, my browser¬†stopped showing me the experiments I had been working on. When I opened the browser console, I was treated to this message:¬†“Refused to create native OpenGL context because of blacklisting.

Blacklisting? That seems awful nasty. Continue reading “Refused to create native OpenGL context because of blacklisting???”

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Geometric Primitives in Motion

Simple shapes like boxes, spheres, and cylinders are called “geometric primitives” or “primitives”, and they’re nice for experimentation because you don’t need to build any models. Just instantiate a box and you’ve got a 3D thing to play with.

For my second experiment in three.js, I thought I’d try putting a bunch of boxes in a row, and then making them oscillate like a sine wave. Continue reading “Geometric Primitives in Motion”

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Embedding three.js in WordPress

Now, Wordpress isn’t exactly the Cadillac of Content Management Systems. And as 3D frameworks for web browsers go, three.js is about as humble as you can get. If I was looking for a powerful elegant solution, perhaps I wouldn’t even be using Wordpress, or three.js, to begin with.

WordPress is a really simple way to publish stuff to the web. And three.js is a really simple way to animate 3D stuff for the web. But unlike plunking an image or a YouTube video onto your page in WordPress, embedding something you’ve whipped up in three.js in WordPress isn’t quite a no-brainer. Continue reading “Embedding three.js in WordPress”

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Plasticine, Lego, Minecraft, and the 3D Web

Most people have modeled stuff with clay, play-doh, Femo, or plasticine. Lots of people have used Lego to make 3D things. But very few of us have created 3D content using digital tools, much less deployed it on the web for others to enjoy.

Everyone alive today is intimately familiar with creating 2D content. We’ve all written on a piece of paper – and most of us have used a word processor to make our content easier to produce and publish. We’ve all drawn a picture on a piece of paper – and most of us have taken photographs to capture much more visual information in the blink of an eye. Continue reading “Plasticine, Lego, Minecraft, and the 3D Web”

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3D Content

For the most part, at this point in time (the beginning of 2016) creating 3D content, publishing it to the web, and making it possible for users from anywhere in the world to find and interact with that content, is a bit of a novelty act.

Whether we’re talking about web1.0, web2.0, or web3.0, there are two key ingredients to the web: content and users.

Before web2.0, users used things like search engines to find content. When web2.0 came of age, other users guided us to content that we may or may not have ever found using web1.0 tools. At the beginning of 2016, we stand on the cusp of web3.0 – a time when the “user agents” of the web will become intelligent enough to guide users to content in a superior manner to that which can be achieved using search engines or social networking. Continue reading “3D Content”

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Thinking in 3D

In a 3D space – you can go anywhere. Up, down, left, right, around the corner – you can find yourself looking at something you looked at from another angle, and see it entirely differently – that’s something you do not experience with a 2D interface.

This is my 3rd post on 3dspace.com. I was playing around with three.js today, and I couldn’t help but notice how once I was thinking about 3D stuff, I was “thinking” in a totally different way than I do in almost anything else I do. I was thinking in 3D. Continue reading “Thinking in 3D”

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