360 Photos with Prisma Effects

I’ve seen the photos re-touched by the Prisma app for weeks. Just the other day, the app became available for Android. I’d been impressed by the things I’d seen. I downloaded it right away.

As I’d been having a good time with 360 photos recently, I decided I wanted to try to add Prisma effects to one of those. Could I make a 360 photo look like a 360 painting?

360 Photo with effects from the Prisma app. Looks like a 360 painting.

[Click image to enter photosphere.]

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Snow and the WebVR Boilerplate

Back in the days of Flash, I’d get to “model” snow a couple of times around Christmas every year. For some animated corporate Christmas cards, usually. So, when the time came to try out the WebVR Boilerplate – that’s what I chose for my first experiment. Gently falling snow.

(The above example is an iFrame – to pop it out for your VR goggles, click here)

The WebVR Boilerplate is a collection of files that does everything you need to do to get something in WebVR up and running, really easy. So that seems perfect for me! The base-state of the boilerplate shows just a rotating cube, in a room defined by a bright green grid. So all I did, to make this demo, was to remove the cube and start coding up the snow!

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360 Photos on the Open Web

One of my hobbies is photography. So as I begin dabbling in VR, I find myself quite curious about 360 photos. A 360 photo is the “bare minimum” of a VR experience.

A flattened Equirectangular Image (an unwrapped 360 image) of a little girl sitting on a jetty at the beach
How can we make this 360 photo fully immersive and available to everyone on the Open Web?

What is a 360 photo?

A 360 photo goes by many names, but each describes a photograph that completely surrounds the camera. It shows what is in front – in back – off to the sides – and above and below. ALL of it. You can look all around, and everywhere you look has been captured in the photo.

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Maple Keys revisited with WebVR

Lie down under a maple tree, and watch the keys lazily drift down towards you. In your VR goggles, with WebVR!

(This is in an iFrame – to pop it out for your VR goggles, click here)

I’d written a demo using THREE.js some time back, that simulated maple keys falling in the spring. Having secured some VR goggles (Samsung Gear VR with a Galaxy S7), and tried no end of VR experiences, it seemed like I should “port” that demo into an immersive version.

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Super Stylized Solar System with A-Frame VR

For my first attempt at creating VR content for the web, I tried something called A-Frame. And it was as easy as the day is long.

(This is in an iFrame – to pop it out for your VR goggles, click here)

Obviously, this demo is just a doodle. A boisterous doodle.

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Virtual Silver Maple Keys

I’ve always loved it when maple keys come showering down from the trees.

So this is what I chose for my first “cross-technology” bit of eye candy. I made a model of a key in Blender. I exported it as a .JSON file, and imported it into three.js. Once there, I created hundreds of it, and wrote some hackey code to make them drift lazily down from the trees right where the camera is pointed. And then I added a 360 degree background image. Continue reading “Virtual Silver Maple Keys”

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360 degree images with three.js

A full wrap-around photographic background goes a long way, turning a few goofy primitives floating in space into an immersive virtual world.

This is just my Dancing Donut exercise of a few weeks back, with the addition of a photograph. Though, how the photograph is structured – and how it is added – is quite different from what you might experience adding a photograph to a flat web page. Continue reading “360 degree images with three.js”

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Code & Art

I didn’t learn anything about three.js doing this – it’s all the same technojunk as my previous “experiments”. But this is fun. This is code & art.

As I was going through the introductory websites for three.js, I couldn’t help but notice that one thing that’s very common in a “beginner’s demo” was virtual worlds stuffed with a whole bunch of similar geometric primitives. Cool. But none of the demos I saw went beyond demo. They tend to be pretty colourless, pretty motionless, pretty boring.

So I couldn’t help but get something stuck in my head. Oh sure, it’s an ocean of geometric primitives. And sure, I didn’t learn anything about three.js doing this – it’s all the same technojunk as my previous “experiments”. But this is fun. Continue reading “Code & Art”

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