Code & Art

I didn’t learn anything about three.js doing this – it’s all the same technojunk as my previous “experiments”. But this is fun. This is code & art.

As I was going through the introductory websites for three.js, I couldn’t help but notice that one thing that’s very common in a “beginner’s demo” was virtual worlds stuffed with a whole bunch of similar¬†geometric primitives. Cool. But none of the demos I saw went beyond demo. They tend to be pretty colourless, pretty motionless, pretty boring.

So I couldn’t help but get something stuck in my head. Oh sure, it’s an ocean of geometric primitives. And sure, I didn’t learn anything about three.js doing this – it’s all the same technojunk as my previous “experiments”. But this is fun. Continue reading “Code & Art”

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on LinkedInShare on FacebookEmail this to someone

Geometric Primitives in Motion

Simple shapes like boxes, spheres, and cylinders are called “geometric primitives” or “primitives”, and they’re nice for experimentation because you don’t need to build any models. Just instantiate a box and you’ve got a 3D thing to play with.

For my second experiment in three.js, I thought I’d try putting a bunch of boxes in a row, and then making them oscillate like a sine wave. Continue reading “Geometric Primitives in Motion”

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on LinkedInShare on FacebookEmail this to someone